The Handbook of Terminology (HOT) aims at disseminating knowledge about terminology (management) and at providing easy access to a large range of topics, traditions, best practices, and methods to a broad audience: students, researchers, professionals and lecturers in Terminology, scholars and experts from other disciplines, such as linguistics, life sciences, metrology, chemistry, law studies, machine engineering, and any other expert domain. In addition, the HOT addresses experts in (multilingual) terminology, translation, interpreting, localization, editing, etc., such as communication specialists, translators, scientists, editors, public servants, brand managers, engineers, and (intercultural) organization specialists. All chapters are written by specialists in the different subfields and are peer-reviewed.

The Prophet Muhammad’s immigration from Mecca to Medina in 622 CE marks the beginning of a decisive era in the history of mankind. Within a few decades, the rising Muslim nation managed to march from Arabia to almost every corner of the known world at the time. The Arabs, who had virtually no contribution to human civilization for centuries before the advent of Islam (c. 609 CE), successfully embarked on an unprecedented journey that transformed the entire world in almost all fields. For centuries to come, the language of knowledge and science was no other than Arabic. No work of any value was produced in any other language. Centers for learning and enlightenment spread across the Islamic empire promoting both Islam and scholarship in general. The scholarly contribution of the Islamic empire was indeed unparalleled in terms of content, depth, value and relevance for the advancement of human civilization.

Medical Terminology Book: Handbook of Terminology, Volume 2: Terminology in the Arab World
Medical Terminology Book: Handbook of Terminology, Volume 2: Terminology in the Arab World

The achievements of that Arab-Islamic empire had taken the world by surprise especially since the Arabs of the pre-Islamic era were generally an illiterate nation. Their intellectual contribution during that period of Jāhiliyyah (c. 500 BCE – 599 CE) was limited to poetry and rudimentary rhymed prose narratives, with localized impact confined to Arabia only. It is true that they were the unchallenged masters of eloquence, but only within the confines of their Arabic language and the borders of Arabia. Their talents were kept local until Islam overtook the world.

Medical Terminology Book: Handbook of Terminology, Volume 2: Terminology in the Arab World

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